Hospitality Management (HP) - Undergraduate Courses

HP-101  -  Introduction to the Hospitality & Tourism Industry   (3 cr)  

This course provides a basic understanding of the fundamental principles of lodging, food and beverage, tourism, gaming, conventions and recreation and leisure operations. A study of the growth and development of the hospitality industry and basic managerial and operating activities is entailed.

HP-102  -  Lodging Operations Management   (3 cr)  

This course entails a systematic study of hotel room division systems detailing the flow of business, reservations, rooming, guest relations, housekeeping, and security. Each department must perform in synchronization in order to provide the guest with a seamless stay. An emphasis is placed upon multi-departmental management skills, especially communication and follow-through.

Prerequisite: HP-101  
HP-111  -  Restaurant Operations Management   (3 cr)  

This course provides an overview of the various departments contained within the restaurant operation. An introduction is made to management and controls in the foodservice operation. The differing roles of service in each outlet are examined. An emphasis is placed upon staffing, menu planning, promotion, cost control, and revenue growth, as well as human resource and safety issues specific to the industry. Students also learn the role of computers/POS systems in restaurant management.

Prerequisite: HP-101  
HP-116  -  Beverage Management   (3 cr)  

This course surveys the many categories of beverages offered in a food service establishment including wines, beers, spirits, and non-alcoholic beverages with a focus on management of both the product and experience for the guest. This course emphasizes service, controls, product knowledge, responsible alcohol service, and liability issues. Guided tastings of all categories are conducted to familiarize students with the nuances of each.

Prerequisite: HP-101  
HP-120  -  Travel and Tourism   (3 cr)  

This course provides students with a basic knowledge of tourism-related concepts and the practical experience that enables them to effectively apply those concepts to the hospitality industry. The course explains how and why people travel, how travel satisfies particular needs and wants, and how marketing efforts can influence travel decisions. Students are urged to complete HP-101 Introduction to Hospitality prior to enrolling in this course.

HP-151  -  Culinary Arts I - Lecture   (2 cr)  

This preparatory course helps students understand the fundamentals of the culinary arts. This course is the lecture component of Culinary Arts I that also includes a lab (HP- 151L) taken concurrently. This course introduces the following main areas: serve-safe, recipe reading, writing and calculations, equipment identification, sanitation, food safety, and other industry standards.

Prerequisite: HP-151L  
Corequisite: HP-151L  
HP-151L  -  Culinary Arts I - Lab   (1 cr)  

This is a fundamental food production course focusing on basic skills, terminology, recipes and procedures learned within the framework of the highest professional standards. Culinary Arts I covers basic culinary techniques focused on the development of sound knife skills. Students work to develop basic and advanced knife cuts, which are the hallmark of the trained chef.

Prerequisite: HP-151  
Corequisite: HP-151  
HP-152  -  Baking Fundamentals for Culinary Students   (3 cr)  

This course explores the fundamental aspects of the bakeshop including basic yeast doughs, quick breads, choux pastry, puff pastry, dessert sauces, ice cream and sorbet bases and a variety of basic plated desserts with an emphasis on basic plating and garnishing techniques for restaurant production from a chef's perspective.

Prerequisite: HP-151 and HP-151L  
HP-153  -  Baking and Pastry I - Lecture   (2 cr)  

This course provides students with the knowledge and theory that form the underpinnings of Baking and Pastry Arts. It introduces the following main areas: the baking profession, serve-safe, sanitation and food safety, weights and measures, recipe reading, writing and calculations, equipment and product identification, proper equipment maintenance and usage, bakeshop principles and techniques, bakery science, and industry standards.

Prerequisite: HP-153L  
Corequisite: HP-153L  
HP-153L  -  Baking and Pastry I - Lab   (1 cr)  

This course explores basic skills and fundamentals of the bakeshop including a variety of doughs, mixing methods, and basic formulas. Basic skills are emphasized and include knife skills, pastry bag skills, rolling and forming doughs, basic cake methods, and quick bread production.

Prerequisite: HP-153  
Corequisite: HP-153  
HP-155  -  Culinary Arts II   (3 cr)  

This is a continuation of fundamental cooking skills learned in the HP-151 and HP-151L Culinary Arts I lecture and lab. This course focuses on basic skills, terminology, recipes and procedures learned within the framework of the highest professional standards. Basic cooking techniques are covered and include stock and soup production, sauces, vegetable cookery, starches, breakfast cookery, cold sauces, and salads. Emphasis is placed on basic and advanced knife skills, and sanitation.

Prerequisite: HP-151 and HP-151L  
HP-164  -  Advanced International Patisserie   (3 cr)  

This class is a detailed study of the pastries and desserts from various nations, including Italy, France, Austria, Switzerland, Germany, Hungary, Russia, Poland, Spain, Portugal, Brazil, Japan, China, the Philippines, the Caribbean, and the United States. The studies include history and origin, examination of the ingredients indigenous to these countries, as well as the techniques used in preparing them.

Prerequisite: HP-165  
HP-165  -  Baking & Pastry Arts II   (3 cr)  

This course integrates training in baking and pastry arts with academic studies and field experience using fundamental baking techniques, food science, aesthetics, and sensory perception as frameworks. It is an examination of taste, baking and pastry techniques, ingredients, and spices. Building upon previous baking and pastry classes, students research recipes, produce them for consumption, and evaluate them. Short papers, a detailed project, menu development, and service are part of this course.

Prerequisite: HP-153 and HP-153L  
HP-201  -  Technology for Hospitality   (3 cr)  

This course is a survey study of the technological tools utilized in managing the various departments within a hospitality enterprise. Students examine the systems used in room inventory management, guest accounting, property management interfaces, food and beverage applications, sales and catering and hospitality accounting.

Prerequisite: HP-101  
HP-215  -  Customer Relationship Management in the Hospitality Industry   (3 cr)  

This course arms students with the problem-solving and decision-making skills essential for hospitality management. With guest satisfaction, retention, and loyalty as the main goals, students are challenged to develop an efficient and appropriate solution to workplace dilemmas. By analyzing and evaluating the causes and effects of a number of real-world incidents, students are prepared to effectively deal with similar workplace scenarios.

Prerequisite: HP-101  
HP-216  -  Global Destinations and Cultures   (3 cr)  

This course provides students with an overview of the global tourism industry, including hospitality and related services, destination/attractions, tourist behaviors, and destination marketing. Emphasis is placed on geography, trends in travel movement at tourism destination areas, travel patterns, and changing interests.

Prerequisite: HP-101  
HP-225  -  Dining Room Management   (3 cr)  

Students learn the principles of fine service and hospitality for restaurants, hotels banquets, and catered events. The course emphasizes customer service, basic table settings, buffet service, and wine and beverage service. Students understand the fundamentals of making reservations, point of sale systems, taking customers' orders, and communication. Students learn seating and table arrangements, traffic flow and event timing. Different styles of service are demonstrated and practiced enabling students to provide and manage superior dining service.

Prerequisite: HP-111 and HP-116 and HP-215  
HP-230  -  Culinary Arts III   (3 cr)  

This course is a practical and theoretical examination of taste, cooking techniques, ingredients and flavoring techniques. Building upon previous cooking courses, students add the protein fabrication techniques to their repertoire of skills. Fabrication of poultry, fish, shellfish, beef, lamb, pork and game are the focus of the course. Students learn the methods of braising, grilling, stewing, sauté, roast, poach, and deep fry.

Prerequisite: HP-155  
HP-235  -  Culinary Arts Practicum   (3 cr)  

Culinary Arts Practicum is the capstone course in the culinary arts program. The course gives students supervised practical application of previously learned skills and theory in a real world restaurant simulation. Students rotate through various stations based on a set menu in order to gain exposure to a la carte restaurant operations. A serve-safe tutorial will run concurrent with this course to allow students to become ServSafe-certified.

Prerequisite: HP-230  
HP-253  -  Techniques of Nutritional and Healthy Cooking (lecture)   (2 cr)  

This course shows students how to handle meal preparation within the nutritional, health-conscious and special needs segments of the food service industry. The curriculum includes heart healthy cooking such as low-fat, low-cholesterol cooking, balanced meal planning, cooking for the health conscious with seasonal, local, and organic ingredients, and meal planning and preparation for the special needs client. This course serves to bring together an understanding of nutrition as a science and cooking as an art. This course is guided by the NRAEF Manage First Nutrition Course, and at the end of the class, the final exam is the NRAEF Certificate Exam.

Prerequisite: HP-155 or HP-165  
Corequisite: HP-253L  
HP-253L  -  Techniques of Nutritional & Healthy Cooking (lab)   (1 cr)  

This course shows students how to handle meal preparation within the nutritional, health-conscious and special needs segments of the food service industry. The curriculum includes heart healthy cooking such as low-fat, low-cholesterol cooking, balanced meal planning, cooking for the health-conscious with seasonal, local, and organic ingredients, and meal planning and preparation for the special needs client. This course serves to bring together an understanding of nutrition as a science and cooking as an art.

Prerequisite: HP-155 or HP-165  
Corequisite: HP-253  
HP-256  -  Latin and Caribbean Cuisine   (3 cr)  

This course builds upon the fundamentals learned in Culinary 1. The course will explore the history and cuisine of the Latin and Caribbean cultures including Haiti, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, Mexico, El Salvador, Argentina, Chile and Brazil, among others spanning the Caribbean, Central, North and South America. The purpose of the course is to expose students to new foods, ingredients, methods of cooking and presentation and to expand their own personal cooking repertoire.

Prerequisite: HP-155  
HP-257  -  Regional Italian Cuisine   (3 cr)  

Regional Italian Cuisine focuses on the cuisines of the following regions: Lombardy, Val D'Aosta, Piedmont, Liguria, Emilia Romagna, Tuscany, Umbria, Puglia, Calabria, and Sardinia. Focus will be on ingredients, techniques and service methods of a variety of dishes from the highlighted regions. Cultural history and other factors affecting ethnic and regional cuisine are discussed.

Prerequisite: HP-155  
HP-258  -  Cuisines of Asia and the Middle East   (3 cr)  

This course focuses on regional styles that have roots in the peoples and cultures of several principle regions of Asia. The major types are East Asian with its origins in Imperial China and now encompassing modern Japan and the Korean peninsula; Southeast Asian encompassing Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and the Philippines; South Asian represented by Burma, India, Sri Lanka and Pakistan; and Middle Eastern, encompassing the cuisines of Saudi Arabia, Israel, Lebanon, Palestine and Turkey.

Prerequisite: HP-155  
HP-259  -  Charcuterie   (3 cr)  

This course deals with the art of advanced production of cured and smoked meats, fish, and poultry as well as the production of sausages, pâtès and terrines of the commercial charcuterie, salumeria, and other gourmet vendors. Emphasis is placed on the use of equipment, sanitation, and the control of temperatures that are imperative to safe production of such specialties.

Prerequisite: HP-230  
HP-260  -  Chocolates & Confections   (3 cr)  

This course introduces students to the principles involved in tempering chocolate, creating chocolate sculptures, forming simple centerpieces, and preparing other confections. Students learn to use both traditional and contemporary production methods in creating confections by hand and with special equipment. Efficient methods are used to increase productivity in this highly specialized field.

Prerequisite: HP-165  
HP-265  -  Contemporary Cakes & Desserts   (3 cr)  

This course is an examination of how cakes and desserts are assembled and decorated with a modern approach, using the latest technology and equipment. Topics include whole cake decoration, molds and rings, and items plated for individual service. Students use specialized equipment, practice presentation methods, and focus on fresh products, simplicity of style and ease of production.

Prerequisite: HP-165  
HP-266  -  Advanced Plated Desserts   (3 cr)  

This course advances the understanding of contemporary plated desserts served in the fine dining segment of the restaurant industry. This hands-on laboratory course focuses on the main elements, garnishes, sauce and saucing techniques, frozen elements, and decorative elements of chocolate, sugar, and other confectionery techniques that are defining contemporary pastry arts in the industry.

Prerequisite: HP-265  
HP-275  -  Baking and Pastry Arts Practicum   (3 cr)  

This is the capstone course for the Baking and Pastry Arts program. The course offers students supervised practical application of previously learned skills and theory in a real world restaurant and Bake Shop simulation. Students rotate through various stations based on a set menu in order to gain exposure to a la carte restaurant and Bake Shop operations.

Prerequisite: HP-265  
HP-290  -  Hospitality Internship I   (3 cr)  

This course provides students with the opportunity to apply classroom theory in actual work settings in paid and un- paid supervised positions in the hospitality industry. Requires a minimum of 10 hours per week of work (a minimum of 120 hours in all) plus tutorial sessions that include discussions of topics related to matters on the job and career exploration. Students are ideally placed within a specific sector of the industry in which they have a professional interest. Extensive use of New York City and Westchester operations. Sophomore standing; Hospitality Students only.

Designation: Field Experience  
HP-291  -  Hospitality Internship II   (3 cr)  

This course provides students with the opportunity to apply classroom theory in actual work settings in paid and un- paid supervised positions in the hospitality industry. Requires a minimum of 10 hours per week of work (a minimum of 120 hours in all) plus tutorial sessions that include discussions of topics related to matters on the job and career exploration. Students are ideally placed within a specific sector of the industry in which they have a professional interest. Extensive use of New York City and Westchester operations.

Prerequisite: HP-290  
Designation: Field Experience  
HP-293  -  Fine Dining Internship   (3 cr)  

This course allows culinary students an opportunity to gain practical experience in our public restaurant "The Dining Lab." Students gain exposure to and repetition of the requisite skills for an entry-level preparation cook position under the supervision of the Dining Lab's chef de cuisine and executive chef, one of whom will serve as supervisor and facilitator of the internship. Students work for a minimum of 120 hours in a variety of prep positions, applying the theories and skills previously learned; exercising the ability to perform in a real, public setting; and building their resume with the experience gained in a high end, fine dining operation. Sophomore standing; Culinary Students only.

Designation: Field Experience  
HP-294  -  Pastry Café Internship   (3 cr)  

This course is designed to allow the pastry student an opportunity to gain practical experience in our public restaurant "The Pastry Kiosk," a lunch-only cafe operation in the School of Hospitality Management/CINY. Students gain exposure to and repetition of the requisite skills for an entry-level baker's assistant position under the supervision of our pastry chef for the operation, who will also serve as supervisor and facilitator of the internship. Students work for a minimum of 120 hours in a variety of assistant baker positions, reinforcing classroom learning and building their resume with the production-based experience gained in a high-end pastry café operation. Sophomore standing; Baking Students only.

Designation: Field Experience  
HP-295  -  Advanced Culinary Symposium   (3 cr)  

This class deals with advanced topics in culinary arts including public culinary demonstrations and competition. Students learn how to successfully prepare for a public culinary demonstration with live cooking and oral presentation. Students also explore culinary competitions by refining their skill level and mental thought process while learning the discipline needed to be properly prepared for culinary competitions. Opportunities may exist for students to take part in American Culinary Federation and Societe Culinaire Philanthropique competitions, the Monroe College Junior Hot Food Team, as well as opportunities for culinary demonstrations in the public arena.

Prerequisite: HP-155  
HP-301  -  Housekeeping Management   (3 cr)  

This course provides students with tools to achieve the expected standards in lodging establishments. Topics such as the role of housekeeping, planning, and organizing, managing human resources, management responsibilities and the details of housekeeping tasks will be covered. In particular, students learn how this department works in tandem with engineering, the front office and reservations.

Prerequisite: HP-102  
HP-302  -  Menu Planning and Design   (3 cr)  

Students are introduced to the role of the menu in the restaurant facility. Emphasis placed upon cost and portion control, wording and descriptions, pricing, and layout/design. Students also learn how to analyze consumer trends and modify the menu in response to them.

Prerequisite: HP-111 and HP-116  
HP-303  -  Front Office Management   (3 cr)  

This course provides an overview of the operations of the front office including the reception desk, concierge, reservations, and bell and door staff. Included in this course are issues related to staffing, guest service, room inventory, and night auditing/accounting. Students learn about property management software and how to apply it in a real environment.

Prerequisite: HP-102  
HP-304  -  Convention & Banquet Planning Management   (3 cr)  

Students learn how the catering function and banquet outlets contribute to the facility's revenues. Emphasis placed on seasonality, types of functions, function design considerations and marketing. Additionally, students learn of a hotel's reliance on convention space and activities by examining the economics of tourism and the residual spending incurred by convention guests.

Prerequisite: HP-111 and HP-116  
HP-305  -  Tourism Planning & Development   (3 cr)  

This course provides students with a thorough understanding of the issues and challenges of planning for sustainable tourism at the local and regional levels. The course examines the basic aspects of planning and developing tourism infrastructure, products, attractions and services. It exposes students to planning principles, procedures, and case studies.

Prerequisite: HP-101  
HP-307  -  Caribbean Travel and Tourism   (3 cr)  

This course covers the development of the tourism industry in the Caribbean. It provides students with a foundational knowledge of the industry and examines the challenges faced by the region in its efforts to move from an agricultural economy to tourism. It also examines the opportunity for growth and alliances in the region.

Prerequisite: HP-101  
HP-308  -  Club Management   (3 cr)  

Students study the organization and management that are specific to private clubs including city, country, and other recreational and social clubs. The course explains the strategy, marketing, membership, human resources, and operations that are specific to the private club segment of the hospitality industry. Field trip may be required.

Prerequisite: HP-101  
HP-309  -  Sports Tourism   (3 cr)  

This course exposes students to the development of sports tourism, including the challenges of developing and operating sports events and venues for mega events. This course emphasizes the financial, facility, environmental, and planning aspects of large-scale events; volunteer management; and the economic and socio-cultural impacts of sport tourism. Field trip may be required.

Prerequisite: HP-101  
HP-310  -  Sales and Marketing for Hotels And Restaurants   (3 cr)  

This course examines all of the operational areas of lodging, food and beverage, and the kitchen from a sales and marketing perspective. Building on the fundamentals learned in prior hospitality coursework, students focus on the means by which they can position, price, and promote their operations. The purpose of the course is to better prepare students to enter sales and marketing or to manage a sales team of a hotel or restaurant. Through a variety of case studies, students are exposed to many situations that they will face in the future in order to address them responsibly.

Prerequisite: HP-111 and HP-116  
HP-311  -  Sustainability in the Hospitality   (3 cr)  

This course explores sustainable business practices across all facets of the global hospitality industry including lodging, food and beverage, meetings and events, and tourism. This course focuses on the social, environmental, and economic principles of sustainable operations, as well as corporate social responsibility. Students develop their critical thinking and decision making skills while gaining new perspectives on the advances, innovations, and challenges of sustainable hospitality operations.

Prerequisite: HP-111  
HP-315  -  Managerial Accounting for Hospitality   (3 cr)  

This course examines all of the operational areas of lodging, food and beverage, and the kitchen from a financial perspective. Building upon the fundamentals learned in AC-161 Principles of Accounting I combined with prior hospitality coursework, students focus on Accounting Fundamentals, Financial Statements, Management of Revenue and Expense, and Accounting Information for Planning. This class focuses on the significance of using financial statements to make crucial management decisions. Through a variety of case studies, students are exposed to many situations which they will likely face in the future and be more ready to address responsibly.

Prerequisite: AC-161  
HP-325  -  Hospitality Law   (3 cr)  

This course provides an understanding of the substantive law, procedural law, principles of the law of contracts, legality and public policy, and consumer protection in regards to the hospitality industry. Particular attention is paid to the issue of liability. Cases are studied and presented for discussion.

Prerequisite: HP-101  
HP-330  -  Advanced Cake Decorating   (3 cr)  

This course explores the skills and techniques needed to create a variety of cake styles from advanced layer cakes to complex occasion cakes designed for the high-end consumer. The skill set includes working with a variety of media including rolled fondant, royal icing, and modeling chocolate. Single tier and multi-tiered cakes are assembled and decorated.

Prerequisite: HP-265  
HP-360  -  Introduction to Food Media   (3 cr)  

This course will introduce students to the scope of food media and the many avenues, media types and styles that make up the vast network. Food media as a concept will be defined and the relevance of food media and related industries in our current society explored. The course will emphasize how food media and its many extensions can be used professionally to promote a food product or concept via a variety of media platforms. By the end of this course, students should be able to understand what food media is, identify its many conduits, and begin to build an idea using food as a medium for those many conduits of digital information.

HP-390  -  Senior Management Apprenticeship I   (3 cr)  

This course provides students with the opportunity to apply classroom theory in actual work settings in paid and un- paid supervised positions in the hospitality industry. Requires a minimum of 15 hours per week of work (a total of 160 hours) plus tutorial sessions that include job-related topics, discussions, and career exploration. Students are ideally placed within a specific sector of the industry in which they have a professional interest. Extensive use of New York City and Westchester operations are made. Junior Standing.

Designation: Field Experience  
HP-391  -  Senior Management Apprenticeship II   (3 cr)  

This course provides students with the opportunity to apply classroom theory in actual work settings in paid and un- paid supervised positions in the hospitality industry. Requires a minimum of 15 hours per week of work (a total of 160 hours) plus tutorial sessions that include job-related topics discussions and career exploration. Students are ideally placed within a specific sector of the industry in which they have a professional interest. Extensive use of New York City and Westchester operations are made.

Prerequisite: HP-390  
HP-395  -  Corporate Internship in Hospitality Management and the Culinary Arts   (6 cr)  

This course provides students with the opportunity to apply the skills learned in the classroom to a corporate experience. Students prepare for their professional career, gaining practical experience while being immersed in a corporate setting. Students are required to complete 320 hours at the Corporate Internship setting.

Prerequisite: HP-390  
HP-401  -  Destination Marketing   (3 cr)  

This course emphasizes marketing principles supported by case studies. The course also examines diverse markets and target marketing. Various promotional activities are explored, including print advertising, public relations, selling, exhibition, direct mail, and the Internet.

Prerequisite: HP-310  
HP-403  -  Gaming and Resort Management   (3 cr)  

This course is an overview of gaming, and casino and resort management in the United States. Students learn rules and security procedures related to each major casino game, to calculate house odds, win, and hold. Students also learn to analyze standard accounting and back office cash procedures. This course also investigates the development and operations of the resort, vacation ownership, multi-use real estate, and gaming entertainment industries. Students also develop an awareness of the societal costs and benefits associated with gaming.

Prerequisite: HP-102  
HP-404  -  Facilities Design and Management   (3 cr)  

This course examines the planning and design of hotels and food service facilities with attention to the economic, aesthetic, and marketing factors that impact project development. Focus is on site analysis, conceptual and space planning, design principles, and the interpretation of architectural drawings. This course addresses the nature of markets, research methodology, trend projection, feasibility, supply and demand evaluations, and financing for project development.

Prerequisite: HP-111 and HP-116  
HP-405  -  Safety and Security in Hospitality   (3 cr)  

This course examines major industry-specific concerns and safety threats, including: asset protection practices; appropriate threat assessment; security survey procedures; specific prevention strategies; various public/private sector security initiatives; and the principles of physical, technical, and environmental security as they apply to hospitality enterprises. The role of hospitality managers in security and safety activities is emphasized.

Prerequisite: HP-102  
HP-408  -  Niche Tourism   (3 cr)  

Divided into three parts, this course offers an in-depth analysis of special interest tourism, tradition and culture- based tourism, and activity-based tourism. It provides an integrated picture of specialty/niche tourism as a whole looking at both the 'macro' and 'micro' niche area. It provides a comprehensive theoretical framework and discusses initiatives, policies, and strategies internationally accepted. Students link theory to practice, by examining case studies from around the world.

Prerequisite: HP-101  
HP-412  -  Entrepreneurship for Hotels and Restaurants   (3 cr)  

This course focuses on the characteristics of successful entrepreneurship within the hospitality industry. The course views the entrepreneur as an independent business individual who efficiently and effectively combines the four factors of production (land, labor, capital and enterprise) to create value by offering a product or service. Emphasis is placed on enterprise, accountability, and the inherent risks and rewards of entrepreneurship.

Prerequisite: HP-310  
HP-420  -  Culinary Showpieces & Grand Buffet   (3 cr)  

This course explores the skills and techniques needed to create a variety of decorative showpieces to adorn the special occasion cold food buffet. Showpieces are composed from mixed media such as tallow, vegetable carvings, and salt dough. Components of the Grand Buffet are designed and executed leading to the creation of an elaborate final buffet.

Prerequisite: HP-155 or HP-165  
HP-430  -  Meeting and Event Management   (3 cr)  

This course examines the hospitality market segment of meeting and event management. The course illustrates all of the skills needed to become a successful event manager. Students learn to design, plan, market, and stage an event, as well as staff management and problem-solving strategies to ensure event success and safety. Topics also include legal compliance, risk management, financial control, and event evaluation.

Prerequisite: HP-102  
HP-431  -  Revenue and Yield Management   (3 cr)  

This course examines the fundamental principles of revenue and yield management. Students analyze the tools and techniques that guide strategic pricing decisions across various selling channels, set inventory controls, and encourage demand manipulation to maximize profits and improve performance in a variety of hospitality operations.

Prerequisite: HP-310 and HP-315  
HP-435  -  Catering Management   (3 cr)  

Catering Management explores all crucial business aspects of banquets and catering both on-and off-premise. The course focuses on banquets and catering within hotels as well as small business management and private catering operations. It presents contemporary menu design and pricing, and strategies to improve food management, scheduling, invoicing, staffing, and training. It also examines food and beverage operational controls that guarantee high standards of quality, service, and presentation.

Prerequisite: HP-111 and HP-116  
HP-436  -  Cost Controls for Food, Beverage and Labor   (3 cr)  

This course focuses on the assessment and control of costs within the foodservice operation. It expands on basic accounting, marketing, and legal principles, as well as food and beverage sanitation, production, and service methods, and staffing and labor cost controls. Technology used in food and beverage operations, such as POS systems, analysis capabilities, a running case study, and menu analysis and engineering are discussed.

Prerequisite: HP-111 and HP-116  
HP-450  -  Hospitality Leadership Capstone   (3 cr)  

This course is allows students to synthesize coursework through researching an aspect of the industry in which they are professionally interested. Students analyze and document business practices, propose viable remedies to challenges they have observed in their studies and present these solutions to the proprietor. Students are also introduced to the array of hospitality-related research journals and other resources that they will reference as they move into the industry as professionals. Senior Standing.

HP-470  -  Food Writing and Blogging   (3 cr)  

This course will explore the many categories of food writing-from short form-descriptive to essay and opinion, to research-based writing, both traditional and field-based. Students will maintain a digital journal (blog) or weekly digital newsletter which will be published, promoted, and shared with the class for discussion. In addition to blogs, the course will focus on digital magazine, journal and news feed articles, personal essays, reviews, recipe-centered pieces, and commentary on social, political and cultural aspects of food. Students will travel into the field to meet chefs, farmers, producers, food artisans and other food writers to collect information to publish on topics of their choice within the culinary landscape.

Prerequisite: HP-360  
Corequisite: HP-360  
HP-475  -  Social Media Marketing of Food   (3 cr)  

This course will focus on applying social media and newly emerging media channels into the marketing of a food concept, product or service. The course will isolate the social media marketing aspects of the overall marketing plan component of a business plan with a focus on branding and market infiltration. The course will address social media engagement with an emphasis on social media ethics while understanding how each of the key platforms works and who they serve. Students will be required to set up individual social media accounts for hands-on development of social media tactics and outlets.

Prerequisite: HP-360  
HP-480  -  Food Styling and Photography   (3 cr)  

This course will introduce the skills and understanding needed to practice to create visual content and story-telling using basic food photography. The course requires no prior photography of food-styling knowledge and is taught from the perspective that students have never picked up a camera, never styled a plate of food, or placed a food product into a visual context. The course will weave together the art and practical requirements needed to release images into the digital domain through a variety of social media outlets not limited to Instagram and Pinterest. The focus will be on food "storytelling", food styling for maximum impact, scene composition, photo shooting, image processing and finally sharing the finished work commensurate with the students practiced skill level. Students will be required to maintain a photo journal or blog to share their work with their classmates.

Prerequisite: HP-360  
HP-485  -  Food Pathways and Media   (3 cr)  

This course will focus on the cultural, social, and economic practices relating to the production and consumption of food. It will explore the intersection of media and food in culture, traditions, and history with emphasis on the role media plays in promoting an understanding of why we eat what we eat and what it means.

Prerequisite: HP-360  
HP-490  -  Food Media Capstone   (3 cr)  

This is a project-driven course which is informed by a central theme and ideas with an emphasis on entrepreneurship. Students will use the tools of social media, their individual creativities and know best practices to articulate an idea from start to launch based on a series of weekly milestones throughout the course.

Prerequisite: HP-475