Liberal Arts (LA)

LA-101  -  Introduction to Psychology   (3 cr)  

This introductory course in psychology teaches the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. In this introductory course, emphasis is placed on the basic principles of human perspective, theories of learning, personality development, emotions and health, and abnormal/clinical psychology. Students are introduced to tests, measurements, and research in the field.

Designation: Social Science  
LA-102  -  Introduction to Sociology   (3 cr)  

This introductory course in sociology studies human behavior in the context of group situations and relationships. This course investigates the nature and structure of social groups and studies how certain social institutions function. Complete with a community service component, this course allows students to see beyond themselves to the greater society in which they live, encouraging social engagement and a commitment to the betterment of society.

Designation: Social Science  
LA-103  -  Introduction to Political Science   (3 cr)  

This course provides students with a fundamental understanding of the political structure of the United States and the powers of the three branches of government at the federal, state, and local levels. Special emphasis is placed on the arrangements and procedures developed to effect the principle of separation of powers, to ensure popular control of governments, and to formulate public policy.

Designation: Social Science  
LA-105  -  Marriage and the Family   (3 cr)  

This course examines the family as an institution: its roles, authority patterns, and functions. Topics studied include the comparison of various family systems, alternate marriage styles, and variations according to class, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, and marital adjustment.

Prerequisite: LA-101 or LA-102  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-106  -  Sex and Gender   (3 cr)  

This advanced social science course explores how sex, gender roles, and the expressions of masculinity and femininity are built into the social structures of American life and various cultures around the world. Analysis of prejudice and discrimination as they exist in social institutions are addressed, as well as ideas for appropriate change for the future.

Prerequisite: LA-101 or LA-102  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-107  -  Introduction to Civil Rights Law   (3 cr)  

This course is an overview of anti-discrimination laws in the United States. It examines theprotection of individual rights afforded by the Constitution by analyzing litigation againstviolations of individual rights. Particular emphasis is placed on race discrimination, sex discrimination, as well as other relevant areas.

Corequisite: EN-111  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-108  -  Psychology of Abnormal Behavior   (3 cr)  

This course examines certain types of abnormal behavior, with a focus on classifying the development, maintenance, and effects of the behavior. The major areas covered include anxiety and stress, dissociative and somatoform disorders, personality and impulse control disorders, psychoactive substance use disorders, sexual disorders, schizophrenia, and suicide.

Prerequisite: LA-101  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-111  -  Introduction to Cultural Anthropology   (3 cr)  

This course investigates social organizations and systems of thought and values that reflect social practice in different cultures. This course provides an introduction to the discipline of anthropology and provides students with an enhanced understanding of human cultures through analysis of the religious, economic, social and political practices of diverse societies.

Designation: Social Science  
LA-112  -  The New York City Experience   (3 cr)  

This course examines New York City in detail from sociological, historical, geographical, political, and cultural perspectives. Topics include the geography of New York City, its unique historical growth and development as a multi-ethnic metropolis, an examination of New York's economy and political system, and an overview of the many cultural achievements that New York and New Yorkers have given to the world.

Designation: Social Science  
LA-117  -  Career Development Seminar   (1 cr)  

The Career Readiness Seminar is designed to facilitates students' entry or advancements in their career. Students begin by articulating their accomplishments and career goals, then craft professional documents to assist in their job searches. Through this seminar, students are exposed to importance of professional branding and networking and develop the soft skills required of professionals. In addition, the seminar covers networking, interviewing and presentation skills. Under the guidance of the instructor, students develop a career portfolio that serves as a repository of their career documents and samples of their academic work.

LA-118  -  Introduction to Music   (3 cr)  

This survey course students introduces some of the highlights and major works of western music since Bach and Handel. The course presents composers and their works in their historical and geographic frameworks and examines their relationship to other art forms such as literature and painting. New York City offers students an unparalleled opportunity to experience live music.

Designation: Fine Arts, Humanities  
LA-119  -  Introduction to Dramatic Arts   (3 cr)  

This course provides an introduction to dramatic art as presented on the stage. Students learn theatre terminology and gain a deeper appreciation for this art form through participation in creative exercises and assignments. Students explore genre, character development and script analysis through the reading and discussion of plays, the attending outside performances, in class presentations, and their own presentation of a 4-5 minute monologue.

Designation: Humanities, Fine Arts  
LA-122  -  Fundamentals of Communication   (3 cr)  

This introductory course in human communication explores the theories and practice of oral and written communication. Students hone practical skills such as working in groups, giving speeches, and making presentations. This course focuses on defining an audience, finding and evaluating information for a presentation, selecting a suitable structure and medium for presenting it, and using language in a clear, concise, and creative manner to communicate ideas effectively. Students develop a digital portfolio as well as research and present a project related to their academic majors.

Designation: Humanities, Social Science  
LA-126  -  The Photographer's Eye   (3 cr)  

Students will explore photography from both perception and production vantage points. Students will study the works of various photographers throughout history and various photographic techniques, and subsequently create their own related original artworks. As such, the course content offers students an opportunity to elevate the quality of their photographs by developing a deeper understanding of and proficiency with the medium.

Designation: Humanities, Fine Arts  
LA-130  -  American History I: Independence to the Civil War   (3 cr)  

This survey course presents students with a broad overview of the people and events that have shaped America from 1776 to the Civil War. Major ideas, institutions, social groups, and crises are examined in historical context.

Designation: Social Science  
LA-131  -  American History II: Reconstruction to The Present   (3 cr)  

This survey course offers a broad overview of the people and events that have shaped America from Reconstruction to the present. Emphasis is on the major ideas, institutions, social groups and crises that have helped to shape contemporary America.

Designation: Social Science  
LA-135  -  Caribbean History   (3 cr)  

The Caribbean is a region that has experienced unique major historical and geographical changes. Various populations of people have migrated into the region. Over the years, these groups have interacted with the landscape and transformed it in many ways. This course uses the "eye" of the historian to survey some of these transformations, from the advent of the Amerindians around 500, to the Twentieth Century.

Designation: Social Science  
LA-145  -  The Psychology of Video Games   (3 cr)  

This course explores the psychological properties and impact of video games. From the history of arcade play, through to home-consoles, MMO's and virtual reality; we will discuss how interface and gaming features influence perception, emotion and cognition; including video games' capacity to cause and/or treat certain mental disorders.

Prerequisite: LA-101  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-160  -  Introduction to Civics and Political Engagement   (3 cr)  

It has been said that a well-functioning democracy requires an informed and engaged citizenry. Therefore, citizens that think together (deliberation) and act together (collective action) are inclined to make a positive impact on society. With this in mind, this course will introduce students to the ways that our society and government functions, how power is distributed, and how citizens can be become civically engaged in order to help bring about positive social change.

Designation: Social Science  
LA-165  -  Civil Rights in America: Past, Present and Future   (3 cr)  

This course explores the history of America's social structure, and how it informed the fight and need for Civil Rights. It will be focused on examining if ideas and conversations about civil rights have changed throughout the history of America. The central question that will be examined is how we, as residents of America in the 21st century, can make sense of Civil Rights as a response to the ingrained social structure and stratification in the country. How do we place Civil Rights in conversation with race, politics, gender, class, and nationality? This class will be a critical, historical, and cultural analysis of the development of Civil Rights, especially for Americans of color, within the United States. Students will be able to articulate why and how the fight for Civil Rights was a necessary response to the social divisions of the country.

Designation: Social Science  
LA-205  -  Professional Communication   (3 cr)  

In this advanced communication course, a variety of speech communication topics are studied with an emphasis on intercultural communication, conflict management, and small group dynamics. A major component of the course is argumentation and debate. Students research and prepare several oral and multimedia presentations, engage in debates, and participate in group projects.

Designation: Social Science  
LA-206  -  Introduction to Spiritual Psychology   (3 cr)  

This course will introduce students to the theories and practicies of spiritual psychology. Spirituality is the broad concept of a belief in something beyond the self, suggesting as a worldview that there is more to life than just what people experience on a sensory and physical level. Instead, it means that something greater connects all beings to the universe itself. It also proposes that there is ongoing existence after death and strives to answer questions about the meaning of life, how human beings are connected, truths about the universe, and other mysteries of human existence. Spiritual psychology looks at the whole human experience and quantum physics. The class will consist of lectures, discussions, individual and small group research projects, and spiritual practices (i.e., meditation, sound bathing, and others).

Prerequisite: LA-101  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-207  -  LGBTQ+ Studies   (3 cr)  

This advanced social science course will explore how sex, gender roles, sexual orientations, the gender expression, and transgender are built into the social structures of American life and various cultures around the world. Analyses of prejudice and discrimination (inequality and stereotyping) as they exist in the social institutions of family, religion, economics, education, and political arenas will be addressed, as well as ideas for appropriate change for the future.

Prerequisite: LA-101 or LA-102  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-208  -  International Relations   (3 cr)  

This course examines the nation-state system; geopolitical struggles in a bipolar and unipolar world; the evolution of the international system and the basic influences that shape the foreign policies of individual nations; and the ideologies and causal interrelations of domestic and foreign policy. It will also focus on the emerging importance of non-state entities and their influence upon international security and diplomatic environment. Students learn about the functions and power of international organizations, such as the United Nations, the World Court, International Court of Criminal Justice, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. Additionally, given the centrality of the United States to global affairs, American foreign policy and American diplomatic history are also discussed.

Prerequisite: EN-111; and LA-102 or LA-103  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-209  -  Contemporary Social Issues   (3 cr)  

This course is designed to investigate contemporary social issues, policies and problems and their impact on American social structures. Society's attempts to solve these social problems are also examined. Students are asked to assess issues in terms of their origins, extent, impact, implications, and various possible avenues of resolution.

Prerequisite: LA-101 or LA-102  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-212  -  Drugs and Behavior   (3 cr)  

This course is an introduction various types of drugs and their impact on behavior. Special attention is paid to the physiological, psychological, and societal effects of psychoactive drugs; patterns and causes of their use and abuse in individuals and societies; and methods of education, prevention and treatment.

Prerequisite: LA-101 or LA-102  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-213  -  Restorative Justice Principles And Practice   (3 cr)  

This course will encourage students to explore restorative justice as a transformative community-based response to crime. Students will review the history and evolution of restorative-based practices and current day applications. Students will also critically examine the basic principles and values of criminal and restorative justice as they relate to stakeholders, including the community. Restorative justice practices, including circles, will be examined for effectiveness in dealing with minor level offenses and more serious crimes. Students will objectively assess the challenges to restorative justice, including the underlying assumption that offenders and victims benefit from the process.

Prerequisite: CJ-101  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-214  -  Developmental Psychology   (3 cr)  

This course examines the behavior of individuals at different ages, from the prenatal period through adolescence. Topics include: caretaker-child relationships, unusual parenting, maternal deprivation, and the effect of environment. Developmental, psychoanalytic, and cognitive theories are discussed.

Prerequisite: LA-101  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-216  -  Positve Psychology   (3 cr)  

This course offers an exploration and a practical application of Positive Psychology Science and Interventions (PPIs), which help us achieve a flourishing, meaningful life. Emphasis will be on learning how to recognize and develop positive emotions, character strengths, and positive experiences in various social settings, such as personal relationships, family, peers and workplace. Throughout this course, students will develop practices, skills, and knowledge that facilitate a path towards well-being and positive behavior. We will also explore how to develop resilience in the context of social and/or individual tension, stress, and anxiety. Furthermore, we will discuss various scientific and theoretical aspects of Positive Psychology, and students will engage in Positive Psychology research projects within their chosen social environment. These Positive Psychology explorations are particularly applicable to social changes during the Covid-19 Pandemic.

Prerequisite: LA-101 or LA-102  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-218  -  Music and Social Culture   (3 cr)  

This course will apply the major sociological perspectives through an examination of the messages expressed in contemporary musical genres. This course will examine various forms of contemporary music as it relates to social culture, starting in the 1950s, through the 20th and into the 21st century. Students will view society through the cultural lens of such music genres as rock and roll, hip hop/rap, pop, alternative, dance, R & B and Folk. This course will help students gain a deeper understanding of the social world in which we live.

Prerequisite: LA-101 OR LA-102  
Designation: Humanities  
LA-235  -  Play Production   (3 cr)  

This course covers all the aspects of play production process (playwriting, directing, acting and designing), allowing students to analyze the structure and building blocks of dramatic plays.

Prerequisite: EN-111 and LA-122  
Designation: Fine Arts, Humanities  
LA-240  -  Criminology   (3 cr)  

The course provides an overview of crime as a social phenomenon from an interdisciplinary perspective. Students discuss classical concepts of criminal behavior followed by a more detailed exploration of the major contemporary biological, psychological, and sociological explanations of criminal behavior. Other significant issues in criminology such as the measurement and extent of crime are also explored.

Prerequisite: LA-101 or LA-102  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-241  -  Juvenile Delinquency   (3 cr)  

This course provides an overview of the juvenile justice system in the United States. Students explore the nature, extent and causes of juvenile delinquency, as well as an understanding of the juvenile justice system. Theories of delinquent behavior and social control responses to juvenile misconduct are discussed as well. Additional topics include contemporary social, political, and legal techniques and strategies.

Prerequisite: LA-101 or LA-102  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-242  -  Victimology   (3 cr)  

This course examines the nature of victimization. Emphasis is placed on the nature of potential risk, as well as demographic and geographical patterns and trends associated with victimization. Relationships between victims and offenders, and the interactions among crime victims and members of law enforcement are also studied.

Prerequisite: LA-102 and LA-240  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-245  -  Introduction to Counseling Theory   (3 cr)  

This course is an introduction to contemporary counseling theories, techniques and their applications. The course examines numerous behavioral models, and both traditional and nontraditional perspectives. Emphasis is placed on conditions for an effective counseling relationship, attending and interviewing skills, basic theoretical assumptions, ethical principles, and professional orientation, including the attributes necessary for the practice of counseling.

Prerequisite: LA-101  
LA-246  -  Child Abuse   (3 cr)  

This course explores the dynamics of child abuse, maltreatment, and neglect. The course provides a historical perspective of child abuse and society's response. Students learn to define different types of abuse, as well as, the role of the social services and legal agencies involved in the detection, processing, investigation, and treatment of both the child abuser and the child victim. This course also provides students with the principles of mandated reporting procedures for child abuse and neglect as it pertains to legal and social service fields.

Prerequisite: LA-101  
LA-247  -  Crisis Intervention   (3 cr)  

This course examines the dynamics of persons in crisis and the various intervention modalities. Areas of focus include theoretical, historical, ethical, and cultural considerations and coping skills. Students are provided with the knowledge, values, and skills to work with people in crisis.

Prerequisite: LA-101  
LA-254  -  HIV/AIDS IN SOCIETY   (3 cr)  

This course examines the nature and causes of HIV Disease and AIDS from a variety of perspectives. The course investigates the scientific and humanistic approaches to understanding the current epidemic. Emphasis is placed on the impact of community and worldwide response, civil rights, legal aspects, harassment, prevention measures, education, counseling, confidentiality, testing, and other vital issues as it relates to HIV/AIDS. Students are expected to communicate among themselves and the instructor in a manner that encourages open and respectful dialogue, appreciates diversity, and tolerates disagreement.

Prerequisite: LA-101 or LA-102  
LA-255  -  Psychology Across the Lifespan   (3 cr)  

This course examines human lifespan development. It covers the psychological development of human life from conception to death. Physical, cognitive, and social modes of development are explored in the stages of infancy, preschool, middle childhood, adolescence and adulthood, and old age. The course explores the psychological approaches to development by major theorists. Pertinent and contemporary topics such as autism, adolescent suicide, midlife crisis and Alzheimer's disease are studied and classic psychological studies in this field are examined.

Prerequisite: LA-101  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-271  -  Political Participation   (3 cr)  

This course explores the following question: Why do individuals choose to participate or not participate in the political process? We will cover themes that drive these decisions, such as voting, political mobilization, and the role of public opinion. The importance of civic engagement will be explored as an important element in democratic life.

Prerequisite: LA-103  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-272  -  Politics in the City   (3 cr)  

This course seeks to examine the governance of US cities, especially focusing on New York City. It explores how its governments are structured, the role of political parties, machine politics and reform movements in US cities. The important roles that ethnicity and race, advocacy and interest groups, business, and labor organizations play in the city will be explored.

Prerequisite: LA-103  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-275  -  The American Presidency   (3 cr)  

Decisions made in the White House have started and ended wars, caused and cured economic crises, and expanded and contracted human rights. The role of the presidency today is remarkably different than when George Washington first took the oath of office in 1789. Using the careers of a select roster of U.S. presidents, students explore concepts of leadership and human dynamics in the political arena and examine how these presidents contributed to pivotal points in American history.

Designation: Social Science  
LA-276  -  Campaigns and Elections   (3 cr)  

This course examines how individuals run for office at local national levels. Topics to be discussed include: the decisions driving people to run for office; the role of political parties, interest groups and the media; campaign finance regulations, and an examination of modern campaign techniques.

Prerequisite: LA-103  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-277  -  Fighting Fake News   (3 cr)  

This course is designed to instruct students on how to think like social scientists. The internet was introduced as the Age of Information in the 1990's. While it is true that we have more information at our fingertips than ever before in human history, the internet has also complicated the search for information by also providing easy and tempting access to misinformation This course prepares students to navigate the treacherous world of the internet, where misinformation can drown out legitimate information. Students will learn to distinguish legitimate sources of information from fake news, pseudo-science, pseudo-history, propaganda, and conspiracy theories. The course will focus on the importance and practices of academic scholarship and professional journalism.

Prerequisite: LA-103  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-278  -  Introduction to Leadership Theories And Management   (3 cr)  

Understanding leadership is essential for professional advancement. This course will examine various leadership theories and explore ways to put these theories into practice. The class challenges students to determine their approach to leadership development and management opportunities. The course content will explore theories, communication styles, and conflict management.

Prerequisite: EN-111;LA-122  
Corequisite: LA-122  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-304  -  Psychological Disorders of Childhood   (3 cr)  

This course provides students with an overview of the clinical issues associated with psychological disorders of childhood, including definitions and classifications, theoretical and historical perspectives, as well as related assessment, diagnostic, and treatment methods. Specific disorders include: behavioral and emotional disorders, developmental and learning disabilities, as well as problems related to physical and mental health in children. Recent studies in the field of psychological disorders of childhood are also examined.

Prerequisite: LA-108 or LA-214  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-305  -  Introduction to Case Management   (3 cr)  

This course covers the core functions of case management through discussion and exploration of fundamental concepts, components, principles and models of case management in various settings. Students learn the best practices associated with effective management of the client from intake through termination. Treatment planning, documentation, and recording are covered with specific case studies incorporated to help students develop case management skills.

Prerequisite: LA-245  
LA-315  -  Personality Theory   (3 cr)  

This course provides a thorough review and critical evaluation of the major areas of personality theories and the work of major theorists. The course examines the various ways psychological researchers have developed theories of personality. Students learn to analyze, critically review, and apply personality theory to everyday life. Also, students develop their critical thinking skills as they conduct research and write about personality theory.

Prerequisite: LA-101  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-325  -  Social Psychology   (3 cr)  

This course discusses the scientific study of the numerous ways that other people influence our thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. One of the main themes in the course are the constant tension between being an individual and yet being subject to pressures from others. Students learn to analyze these situational forces that impinge on their everyday lives and in the process become able to choose how to respond.

Corequisite: LA-101 or LA-102  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-340  -  Social Deviance   (3 cr)  

This course examines deviance as a social phenomenon with particular attention on its causes, and the methods developed to address deviant behavior. Students explore the nature of both criminal and non-criminal forms of deviance, theoretical perspectives the causes of such behaviors, and the role of society in labeling certain segments of the population as deviant. The course also examines how culture, race, gender, law, and power shape current and historical definitions of deviance.

Prerequisite: LA-102 and LA-240  
LA-345  -  Group Dynamics   (3 cr)  

This course provides an orientation to group dynamics and group leadership. Various kinds of groups, group leadership styles, and basic skills for group leaders are studied, with special attention given to group intervention strategies for the beginning stage, the middle stage, and the closing stage of a group. Emphasis is placed on helpful skills and strategies for dealing with problem group situations and group work with specific populations.

Prerequisite: LA-245  
LA-350  -  Urban Sociology   (3 cr)  

This course, divided into four units, provides an in-depth understanding of cities, their unique qualities, and persistent problems. In the first unit, students explore the historical evolution of human settlements and the emergence of urban society. In the second unit, the rise of urban America is examined including the structure and organization of cities in the United States and how they compare and contrast to their suburban counterparts. The third unit examines the social environment of large cities by looking at race, ethnicity, gender, class, and how they shape the urban experience. The fourth unit examines the causes and potential solutions to some of the major social and economic issues confronting large cities today.

Prerequisite: LA-101 or LA-102  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-355  -  Multicultural Psychology   (3 cr)  

This course examines the effects of culture and enculturation on human cognitions, emotions, and behaviors. The major areas explored are the influence of culture on human behavior and mental processes, cross-cultural research methods, enculturation and socialization, culture and attachment, culture and its influences on cognition, emotion, social behavior, and disorders.

Prerequisite: LA-101  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-370  -  Introduction to International Politics   (3 cr)  

This course is an introduction to the issues and processes of U.S. international relations. Key themes to be explored include: why no nations go to war? How do nations and their decision-makers decide between conflict and mutual cooperation? Does morality and ethics impact international relations? The ultimate goal of this course to assist students in understanding the global nature of our current context and how the relations of nations impact our lives together.

Prerequisite: LA-103  
LA-375  -  Politics in Film   (3 cr)  

This course will explore some important political topics and themes as they are explored in major motion pictures. Students will examine how films portray the political process and how it may potentially influence society's attitudes toward politicians and the political process.

Prerequisite: LA-103  
LA-400  -  Principles and Theoretical Perspectives on Parenting   (3 cr)  

This course examines the reciprocal interactions between parent and child from birth to adulthood including consideration of cross-cultural, historical and societal influences, and various family characteristics. The principles and theoretical foundations of parent-child relationships are explored, including establishing and maintaining a nurturing relationship between parents and children, and parent-child communication. Current issues affecting parenting are also studied.

Prerequisite: LA-214  
Designation: Social Science  
LA-410  -  Multi-Cultural Diversity Competency   (3 cr)  

This course explores the dynamics of cultural diversity and the competencies needed to work effectively in human service domains. The shared values, traditions, norms, customs, religion, art, history, folklore, and language of specific cultural groups are covered with a focus on race, gender, sexual orientation, and ethnicity. Students examine language barriers, stereotyping, prejudice, and value differences and gain an appreciation of the need for tolerance and the acceptance of cultural diversity in relation to the provision of services to people in society.

Prerequisite: CJ-320  
Designation: Social Science